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Angel in the Outfield

Darrell Rosenow was born to Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Rosenow and raised in the Clay Center-Green area. He was Valedictorian of his 1954 graduating class at Clay Center High School. Rosenow received a B. S. and M. S. in Agronomy at Kansas State University. In 1964 Darrell went Texas A&M to work on his doctorate in agronomy.

While in college at Texas A&M, Darrell worked at the Agriculture Experiment Station in Lubbock, Texas. When he received his doctorate in 1970, Dr. Rosenow, known as ‘Doc,’ was hired as a permanent worker at the experiment station. His work focused on improving “grain sorghum growth in developing areas of the world and for domestic use. His research and experimentation lead to genetically enhanced grain sorghum that is used in agriculture domestically and as a food internationally feeding 500 million people.”

When Doc was not at work, he was spending time with his wife, Beverly and their three daughters, Becky, Kristi, and Sheri. Darrell’s love of softball began in Kansas where he played on the Clay Center Co-Op/Community High School fast pitch softball team, as pitcher, with his brother Don Rosenow (Clay Center) and others such as Raymond Nelson (Riley), Lyle Pfaff (Leonardville), Joe Steiner (Manhattan), Lyle Walter (Riley), the late Dennis Grater (Clay Center) and the late Clair Johnson (Leonardville). The team took championships in 1958 and 1962 and other teams Doc played on took national titles in 1994 and 1996. In 2000, Doc was inducted in the Kansas Amateur Softball Association (ASA). His brother Don was inducted as a player also in 1990 and their father Ivan was inducted in 2001 as a softball manager.

This love of softball, lead Doc to coaching the Coronado (Lubbock, Texas) summer girls team, Pony Express, in 1999. Doc donated money and devoted many hours to the summer program and worked with the players, especially the pitcher, during the off-season. “He strived to help the athletes succeed,” said Doc’s brother, Don. “He also mentored and was a great friend of JJ Johnson, Coronado High School’s softball coach.”

When Darrell ‘Doc’ Rosenow died in October 2009, the Coronado softball family lost a man of great character and integrity who was dedicated and devoted to the development of the girls’ softball program. Doc was dubbed “Angel in the Outfield” and on February 22, 2011, the Coronado High School softball field was named DARRELL ‘DOC’ ROSENOW FIELD.

Don Rosenow threw out the first ceremonial pitch at the field named for his brother while everyone in attendance released red balloons in Doc’s honor.

The plaque at the softball field reads:

“Doc was a rare selfless individual, but most of all an example of great character and integrity. He passed away after a sudden illness on October 10, 2009 but the lessons and memories he instilled in those around him will survive forever.

“Doc had a long career as a fast pitch softball player, specifically as a pitcher, in Texas and Kansas. He played in several national tournaments winning titles in 1994 and 1996. He is a member of the Kansas ASA Hall of Fame. His love of the game led him to begin coaching the Coronado summer team, Pony Express, in 1999. He continued to oversee the summer and fall teams for a decade. The girls he coached learned to strive not only to be great athletes, but to be great people.

“It was in his nature to help people and he devoted his life’s work to the improvement of grain sorghum growth in developing areas of the world and for domestic use. His research and experimentation has lead to genetically enhanced grain sorghum that is used in agriculture domestically and as a food internationally feeding 500 million people.

“The Coronado Softball program would like to honor the life of this amazing man, not only for his achievements, but for the impact he had on the girls he coached and anyone who had the privilege of knowing him. He will forever be with us on the field and in our hearts. Doc is truly our “Angel” in the Outfield.”


Source by Cynthia A Harris

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